Blog Archives

What happens if you staple ESD Bags shut?

Question:

What happens if you staple ESD Bags shut? Does that damage the ESD Bag’s effectiveness? What if the ESD Bag is heat sealed shut & a staple on the seam is used to attach paperwork?

Answer:

Charleswater ESD Shielding Bags have a layer of metalized film which creates continuous conductive enclosure or Faraday Cage to provide electrostatic shielding protecting the ESD sensitive devices placed inside the Bag. The use of stapling to close ESD Bags is counter productive and not recommended. The metal staple provides a conductive path from the outside of the ESD Bag to the inside. The use of a metal staple would undermine the effectiveness of the ESD Bag making a conductive path for charges outside the Bag to charge outside the Bag to charge or discharge to ESD sensitive components inside the Bag.

To close the ESD Bag, it is recommended to heat seal, or use Charleswater ESD Labels after the opening of the bag has been folded over.

To view Charleswater ESD Labels Click Here

Or to view Charleswater Antistatic Tape Click Here

Carefully locating the staple to only the seam of the Charleswater Statshield® Bag would theoretically make it part of the “continuous conductive enclosure” and be acceptable. However, we are not aware of any end user using this method and cannot recommend it. The staple would be an exposed conductor that could charge or discharge to ESD sensitive devices.

To ask an ESD Question Click Here.

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Developing an ESD Control Programme

by Ryne C. Allen and Gene Felder, Desco Industries

ESD events are the cause of maddening, difficult-to-duplicate, and intermittent product malfunctions. They consume a great deal of time, annoy all involved, and are often never resolved.

Combating the invisible enemy with an effective ESD control program can produce financial benefits. But the greatest savings come from decreasing latent defects, which are extremely difficult to detect after the component is assembled into a finished product.

Any relative contact and physical separation of materials (or flow of solids, liquids, or particle-laden gases) can generate electrostatic charges. Common sources include personnel, items made from common polymeric materials, and processing equipment. ESD can damage parts by direct contact with a charged source or by electric fields emanating from charged objects that induce a charge on ungrounded sensitive items.

To view more information on how to Develop an ESD Control Program CLICK HERE